Colorado State Senate District 30 candidate Q&A

Braeden Miguel

Democratic Party

AGE
30
RESIDENCE
Highlands Ranch
PROFESSION
Self Employed/ Small Business
EDUCATION
Science and Business Degree
EXPERIENCE
12 years small business photographer, 2 years in STEM education, 2 Years managing Million Dollar Board
WEBSITE • FACEBOOK • TWITTER

What are your top three priorities for the next legislative session?
Pass a mental health investment bill that works to cap the out-of-pocket costs for students to get counseling and mental health degrees and training. In partnership with schools to lower costs, we can begin to train the number of experts and professionals necessary to really reach those who need it.

Work to create a more thought out water and agricultural plan. We should be filling up our water reservoirs, securing them, thinking about our soil, and planning out how to best use the western drought funds of the Federal IRA funds into smart projects.

Help lead a conversation on how the energy and infrastructure money can be laid out and invested into Colorado and its future.

The chamber may see split Democrat-Republican control next year. On what issues do you see common ground with the opposite party?
I believe that common ground should be found in water policy, housing, and investment into better mental healthcare access. These are all on the minds of people all over our state and I believe I bring a lot of perspective and ideas that Republicans and us could work together on.

While some of my ideas and interests might seem new to others, I assure everyone that it is a mix of practical design along with a loving and caring nature. Something I think both sides should agree on.

What perspective or background would you bring to the chamber that is currently missing?
Funny enough I turned 30 this year while running for Senate District 30. All coincidence as I just ended up living where I got to grow up and only recently while walking trails did I begin to think why not I run to win and represent the area that has meant so much to my life.

Overall I do think I bring an imaginative, creative, and youthful perspective. Growing up with technology I also have a better understanding on a lot of concepts like digital security, social media, and innovation that can be lacking.

What more can the state legislature do to ease housing costs across Colorado?
For some, property taxes are skyrocketing as property values rise. This along with the cost of living spikes lately is pushing people to work past retirement or have to make a lifestyle or housing change before they were expecting. One thing is protecting legacy homes from large market fluctuations and pressures.

The main issue with housing though is supply, and which follows then is the cost. We also have no low tier option meaning poverty or emergency means homelessness. I would work on supply through into small affordable units and dwelling options. I also think sanctioned tent cities with clean water, security, and stability ends up being cheaper and more human way of dealing with homelessness and back to health.

Do you support the current law on fentanyl possession and resources for treatment?
I believe the police officers spoke to their perspective, social workers spoke to theirs, and with all the different perspectives and professionals adding in – we got a pretty decent bill and step forward. It helps treatment and funding, and while the bigger problem of what causes and can come from addiction and mental health crises is still out there – some good and leniency is being done to help.

Kevin Van Winkle has not returned the questionnaire.

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How candidate order was determined: A lot drawing was held at the Colorado Secretary of State’s Office on Aug. 3 to determine the general election ballot order for major and minor party candidates. Colorado law (1-5-404, C.R.S.) requires that candidates are ordered on the ballot in three tiers: major party candidates followed by minor party candidates followed by unaffiliated candidates. Within each tier, the candidates are ordered by a lot drawing with the exception of the office of Governor and Lt. Governor, which are ordered by the last name of the gubernatorial candidate.

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