Thieves steal 1,000 pints of beer left to age inside underwater shipwreck

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Brazen thieves have stolen 1,000 pints of beer left to mature inside an underwater shipwreck.

They carried off the seabed booze heist off the coast of Argentina.

Three local breweries stashed the alcohol in the remains of a fishing vessel last November.

Bosses thought it would be safe as it was submerged three miles from the city of Mar de Plata, under 65feet of water.

But divers discovered the 600litres (1,055 pints) of booze was missing when they went to retrieve the barrels last week.

They found an empty metal casing after thieves ransacked the stash.

One diver said the “dreams of brewing beer at the bottom of the ocean” had been ruined by the crooks.

The limited edition beer was due to be blended with another before being bottled up and sold.

Proceeds were due to go to the Lorenzo Scaglia Municipal Museum of Natural Sciences in Mar de Plata.

Carlos Brelles, 52, who owns the Thalassa Diving School and participated in the initial dive in November, admitted he had started crying after hearing about the crime.

He said: "I guess we are talking about two or three people that were behind this that travelled to a sunken ship and after diving 20metres, stole the barrels where the beer was brewing.

“The dreams of brewing beer at the bottom of the ocean have gone.

“They didn't only steal the barrels, they stole the hopes of businessman and wage-earners who have not had a good year.

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“They stole the possibility to raise money that would have helped fund the Museum of Natural Sciences of Mar de Plata.”

Local breweries Heller, La Paloma and Baum de Mar de Plata had recruited divers last year to bury the drink.

The stash was securely fastened to the ship Kronomether, which was abandoned in a port after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

The vessel was later scuttled off the Argentine coast in 2014 to become a popular site among divers.

  • Crime
  • Alcohol
  • Money

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